Covert operations in Ecuador

Promoting the idea that a government is bad and unpopular is essential to the objective of overthrowing it.

Since the beginning of the ‘pink tide’ in Latin America, much of the international media have been actively smearing progressive Latin American countries.

These media outlets, who have the means to reach global audiences, selectively report the news in what some consider to be an effort to destabilize leftist governments that dare to challenge the economic privileges of big business, banks and financial corporations.

Several South American leaders have argued that private media discredit their governments as parts of plots to overthrow them and replace them with governments more aligned with U.S. interests.

Late Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez warned of this repeatedly, and in 2002 this materialized into a short-lived coup. The coup was broadcast live and media were shown to have played an active role, deliberately distorting information to the Venezuelan public as well as to the international community in order to justify the usurpation of democracy in the country. Though the coup failed, media attacks against Chavez continued, and have now focused intensely on his successor, President Nicolas Maduro.

Since taking office in 2007, Ecuadorean President Rafael Correa has also been the target of a media smear campaign both within and outside of the country. Correa has not only championed laws to democratize media in order to break up the power of monopolies, but he has also been vocal in calling out the attacks on his and other progressive governments.

“Do you think really that the difficult situations (faced by) Dilma Rousseff … in Brazil, Nicolas Maduro in Venezuela, Michelle Bachelet in Chile, Cristina Fernandez in Argentina and the difficulties that Evo Morales has had in Bolivia before winning an overwhelming majority, are all accidental?,” Correa told a groups of reporters in 2015. “They are all leaders of leftist governments … None of this happens to right-wing leaders.”

The Goal: End Latin American Integration

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Temer: Coup Government to Make Drastic Cuts to Housing Program

temer-1The coup-imposed government of interim President Michel Temer announced it will make drastic cuts to one of the country’s flagship social programs that provides low-cost housing to Brazilians, O Globo newspaper reported Saturday.

The cuts are set to mostly impact Brazil’s poorest.

The housing program, together with the Bolsa Familia subsidy for low-income people, is crediting with lifting millions out of poverty and are considered the flagship social programs of the leftist Workers’ Party governments led by Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva and Dilma Rousseff.

The program provides a subsidy to people depending on their level of income, with the lowest earners receiving housing virtually free-of-cost.

The cuts will affect these lowest earners the most. People in the second-lowest earning bracket will also face deep cuts.

The government will only honor existing contracts for social housing developments already underway.

The democratically elected government of suspended President Dilma Rousseff had made a commitment in February to build 2 million new units of social housing.

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Temer Orders Military to Surround Residence of Dilma Rousseff

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Senate-imposed Interim President Michel Temer has deployed military troops to cordon off the area surrounding the Palácio da Alvorada, residence of the suspended President Dilma Rousseff,  Brazilian Senate Vice President Jorge Vianna said on Thursday.

Vianna said there’s a checkpoint at the Palácio do Jaburu, where Temer currently resides, and which is very close to Rousseff’ residence in the capital of Brasilia.

“Anyone visiting President Dilma has to go through a checkpoint installed at Jaburu, with several heavily armed military (personnel)… I just made a visit to President Dilma. I was with the president of the National Congress. And we had to identify ourselves and wait a long time before getting the access,” Vianna said.

“This means that the elected president is under siege? What country is this? What provisional government is this?” the senator added.

Temer assumed the post of interim president last week following the suspension of President Dilma Rousseff, who is now facing a Senate impeachment trial.

Rousseff, along with millions of others across the country, regards the move as a coup waged by the right-wing opposition.

Despite formerly chairing the oil giant Petrobras — from which several former and current officials are linked to the corruption scandal dubbed “car wash” —  Rousseff has not been formally tied to the scandal and there are no formal charges against the socialist leader.

#MichelTemer: Wikileaks and US

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Whistleblower website WikiLeaks described the Senate-imposed President of Brazil Michel Temer as a “U.S. Embassy informant” in a tweet and provided two links where Temer’s candid thoughts on Brazilian politics serve as the basis for a report by the U.S. embassy in Brazil.

The cable from Jan. 11, 2006, states that Temer met with embassy officials on Jan. 9, 2006 to give his assessment of Brazil’s political landscape ahead of the 2006 general election that saw Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva reelected to the presidency.

Temer became interim president after the Brazilian Senate voted to proceed with an impeachment trial against President Dilma Rousseff, forcing her to step down for a period of 180 days.

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Brazil Deploys 200,000 Troops to Combat Zika Virus

Municipal workers gesture before spraying insecticide at the neighborhood of Imbiribeira in Recife.

 

Soldiers will be making house-to-house visits to spread awareness of the mosquito-borne virus.
Brazil is deploying more than 200,000 soldiers to battle the Zika virus, which is believed to cause severe birth defects, the health ministry announced Wednesday.

The troops will make house-to-house visits to spread awareness of the mosquito-borne virus, handing out leaflets and insect repellent to Brazilians.

The campaign, due to last just one day, Feb. 13, comes amid fears that the outbreak could affect the upcoming Rio Olympic Games.

The mosquito-borne virus causes symptoms similar to dengue and chikungunya, including fever and joint pain. According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control, no confirmed cases of Zika have led to death, and symptoms normally last no longer than a week.

However, in recent weeks health officials have raised concerns the virus could be linked to a rare brain defect among newborn babies, which has caused deaths.

“Although Zika typically causes only mild symptoms, outbreaks in Brazil have coincided with a marked increase in microcephaly – or unusually small head size – in newborns,” PAHO said. “Pregnant women should be especially careful to avoid mosquito bites.”

In Brazil, microcephaly, a condition which affects the development of an infant’s brain, is believed to have affected 3,893 newborn babies since authorities began investigating the surge in October, local officials announced earlier this month.