The assassination of the Mexican journalist Javier Valdez

Another journalist was murdered in Mexico Monday, marking the sixth assassination of a reporter so far this year in one of the deadliest countries in the world for media workers.

Javier Valdez, a correspondent covering the drug-related violence and crime beat in the state of Sinaloa for Mexico’s largest daily newspaper, La Jornada, was shot dead around midday in Sinaloa’s capital of Culiacan, home base for the notorious Sinaloa cartel previously run by jailed drug lord Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman.

Valdez had released a new book just last year titled, “Narco Journalism.” The reporter was shot in the street, the Red Cross reported, where his body was left after the fatal shooting. Continue reading “The assassination of the Mexican journalist Javier Valdez”

Brazilian Anarchists, Communists March Against Temer

One year after the parliamentary coup that ousted former Brazilian president Dilma Rousseff and installed right-wing Michel Temer as president, the third edition of the annual Antifascist March on Saturday saw hundreds protesting in a number of cities across Brazil.

Organized by legions of anarchists, communists and a number of other left-wing organizations, the march was held in 20 cities and 15 states. It was organized in order to protest against the country’s “conservative advance” and the policies of the extreme right.

Continue reading “Brazilian Anarchists, Communists March Against Temer”

Venezuelan official Samuel Moncada denounces OAS plans

C_rTjhaWsAABiNDThe Organization of American States has summoned a ministerial meeting, pursuing an instability plans for Venezuela.

According to Venezuelan official, Samuel Moncada, the wingspan of the OAS plans brought as a result a special regulation for the next chancellor´s meeting hosted by Canada. Continue reading “Venezuelan official Samuel Moncada denounces OAS plans”

On Mexican Mother’s Day, Hundreds of Mothers March for Their Disappeared Children

Mothers and relatives of Ayotzinapa 43 students

Mexican mothers are marching for their missing and disappeared children Wednesday, marking Mother´s Day in the country in a mass demonstration to demand justice from the state.

In the heart of Mexico City, hundreds marched from Paseo de la Reforma to the Angel de la Independencia, where organizers read out a manifesto titled, “Neither forgetfulness nor forgiveness nor reconciliation,” and instead demanded the release of political prisoners the world over and a solution to the problem of enforced disappearances by the state. Continue reading “On Mexican Mother’s Day, Hundreds of Mothers March for Their Disappeared Children”

Another Mexican Journalist Murdered in Front of His Family

Ricardo Monlui Cabrera was killed in the Mexican state of Veracruz, which is considered to be the most dangerous areas for journalists in Latin America.

Mexican journalist Ricardo Monlui Cabrera was shot dead Sunday while leaving a restaurant with his wife and son in Veracruz, a state that journalists consider one of the country’s most dangerous for reporters, a state commission reported.

“No member of his family was injured,” Jorge Morales, executive secretary of the State Commission for the Care and Protection of Journalists, told AFP. That group was created in 2012, after nine Veracruz journalists were murdered within months.

Monlui was the editor of a local business newspaper, El Politico, and wrote a column covering area politics and the sugarcane industry.

A source close to the local prosecutor’s office said Monlui and his family had been invited to breakfast at a popular restaurant in the town of Yanga.

As they were walking back to their car, another car pulled up and at least two gunmen opened fire, leaving Monlui’s body sprawled on the asphalt, the source said, speaking on grounds of anonymity.

The last Mexican media person to be killed was Cecilio Pineda, shot dead earlier this month in Guerrero state as he lay resting in a hammock.

Mexico is the most dangerous country in Latin America for journalists, particularly those working to expose corruption and criminal networks.

Continue reading “Another Mexican Journalist Murdered in Front of His Family”

CIA pays ‘traitors’ who say we trafficked drugs: President Nicolas Maduro

nicolas20maduroVenezuelan President Nicolas Maduro on Tuesday accused the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency, CIA, of paying former Chavista leaders to invent evidence with which to accuse the socialist government of drug trafficking.

Maduro, who said the suspects are “a group of traitors who were from the Bolivarian Revolution,” vowed to expose them with forthcoming intelligence reports. He said most of them are based in the U.S. with others still operating within the country.

“I am going to reveal the evidence of how they have worked with the CIA and the NSA,” Maduro said at a televised Presidential Council meeting.

“The evidence will give them cold sweats and diarrhea.”

Last month, the U.S. Treasury Department put Venezuelan Vice President Tareck El Aissami on a sanctions list for allegedly aiding drug traffickers. They claimed El Aissami is linked to coordinating drug shipments to Mexican drug cartel Los Zetas and a Colombian drug lord.

The U.S. Treasury Department, however, has never released specific evidence directly linking El Aissami to any of these claims. Their only sources are “unnamed” former government employees who defected from the Bolivarian Revolution.

Continue reading “CIA pays ‘traitors’ who say we trafficked drugs: President Nicolas Maduro”

Mexican Actor Gael Garcia Bernal Slams Trump’s Border Wall at Oscars

 

The Mexican star has blasted Trump in the past, and the Oscars were no exception.

Mexican actor Gael Garcia Bernal used his time on the Oscar’s stage Sunday to criticize President Donald Trump and his border wall plan as one of many celebrities to raise political themes during the Academy Awards ceremony.

Presenting the Oscar for best animated film, Garcia Bernal slammed Trump’s promise to build a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border.

“Flesh and blood actors are migrant workers. We travel all over the world, we build families, we construct stories, we build life that cannot be divided,” he said.

“As a Mexican, as a Latin American, as a migrant worker, as a human being, I’m against any form of wall that wants to separate us.”

Garcia Bernal, known for his performance in films including “The Motorcycle Diaries” and “Amores Perros” as well as the web television series “Mozart in the Jungle,” has spoken out about Trump in the past.

After Trump’s Nov. 8 election, Garcia Bernal tweeted in Spanish, “Build your fucking wall. History will take care of the failed plan to make Mexico pay. And to open the holes that there will always be.”

Weeks earlier, he told “The Late Show with Stephen Colbert” that although Trump’s run for president was initially seen as a “joke” by Mexicans, his popularity eventually sparked “nervousness, fear and anger” — sentiments that have only increased since the reality TV star-turn-president took over the White House.

Continue reading “Mexican Actor Gael Garcia Bernal Slams Trump’s Border Wall at Oscars”

Cuba defends itself before the OAS, Felipe Calderon and Mariana Aylwin

“Cuba will never return to the OAS,” Cuba’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs wrote in a statement. 

Cuba denied entry to the Organization of American States (OAS), head of the OAS, Luis Almagro, who was to receive a prize from a mercenary group in Havana.

The socialist government also denied entry to former Mexican President Felipe Calderón and Mariana Aylwin, daughter of former Chilean President Patricio Aylwin.

Mainstream media quickly painted Cuba’s decision to block their entry as another example of the country’s so-called “totalitarianism.” But shortly after they released these reports, Cuba’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs commissioned a statement clearing up these accusations.

“The plan, plotted on several trips between Washington and other capitals of the region, was to mount in Havana an open and serious provocation against the Cuban government, generate internal instability, and damage the international image of the country,” the statement reads.

“Upon learning of these plans and enforcing the laws that underpin the nation’s sovereignty, the Cuban government decided to deny foreign nationals associated with the events described above to the national territory.”

According to the statement, Cuba refused entry to Almagro for three main reasons:

Continue reading “Cuba defends itself before the OAS, Felipe Calderon and Mariana Aylwin”

OLP condemns the visit of President of Paraguay to the Old City of Jerusalem

Paraguay and Israel are looking to expand economic and cultural cooperation, particularly in technology and agriculture.

 Paraguayan President Horacio Cartes is looking to strengthen ties with Israel Tuesday during the final day of his three-day visit with Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu.

In addition to addressing economic, social, and cultural cooperation with Netanyahu on Tuesday, Cartes also met with Israeli President Reuven Rivlin on Monday to discuss agreements on technology, agriculture, and education.

The Paraguayan president will also meet with opposition leader Isaac Herzog on Tuesday and visit an engineering school.

The Jerusalem Post called Cartes a “rare ally in South America,” along with Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos.

Cartes lauded “an exciting and historic time” for both countries and welcomed the broadened cooperation. In recent years, Paraguayan officials have heralded the South American country as the entry point for Israeli technology in Latin America, while Israeli politicians have hailed its “favorable” tax system and “stable business environment.”

But Cartes’ visit hasn’t been without controversy. The Palestine Liberation Organization slammed the Paraguayan head of state for visiting the Old City of Jerusalem in occupied Palestinian territories as part of his diplomatic agenda.
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Debt restructuring in Puerto Rico: US Senate

The PROMESA Bill plans to give a U.S. federal board control of Puerto Rico’s economy to pursue austerity and debt restructuring.

The United States Senate voted on Wednesday to advance a controversial bill to address Puerto Rico’s crippling US$70 billion debt crisis, just days before the Caribbean island is poised to default on a US$1.9 billion debt payment.

Senators voted 68-32 for cloture of the bill, setting up a vote on final passage no later than Thursday afternoon.

Lawmakers predicted that the vote will be tight as supporters scramble to get the Puerto Rico Oversight, Management, and Economic Stability Act, also known as the PROMESA Bill, through Congress before Puerto Rico’s July 1 debt payment deadline.

PROMESA proposes to hand control of Puerto Rico’s economy, including debt restructuring, over to a Washington-appointed federal oversight board.

Both Republicans and Democrats back the bill. Though several Democrats have raised concerns about the structure of the legislation, many also argue that the consequences of a default without a plan in place are too serious to justify opposing the bill.

House Democratic leader Nancy Pelosi, who has voiced criticisms of the bill, said a failure to pass PROMESA would mark “a tremendous win for the unscrupulous hedge funds that have held this bill up for six months demanding to be first in line over the needs of the people of Puerto Rico.”

Debt expert Eric LeCompte, executive director of Jubilee USA, argued in a letter to the Senate on Tuesday that the “very serious” impacts on Puerto Rico if the bill fails would include threats to social services and pension protections, as well as a swoop of predatory “vulture funds” looking to exploit the economic crisis on the island.

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Continue reading “Debt restructuring in Puerto Rico: US Senate”