Mexican campesinos protest against NAFTA

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Hundreds of agricultural workers marched in Mexico City against the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) august 7, 2017.

Hundreds of Mexican campesinos marched through the streets of the country´s capital city to demand the government leave agriculture out of the new NAFTA free trade agreement.

The protesters assured that Mexican president Peña Nieto will place the interests of transnational food corporations above the needs of the country’s small-scale farmers and further threaten the country’s agricultural sector.

The march headed from the Angel of Independence to the Ministry of the Interior, and was made up of members of the Ayala National Coordination Scheme, a campesino collective that defends land rights.

“We are not going to allow an unfavorable negotiation or that we fall on our knees before the United States. This is the beginning of a campaign for the agricultural sector to be completely excluded from NAFTA,” the organization said.

Agrarian organizations and popular movements have criticized NAFTA for affecting the country’s small producers and hurting Mexico’s overall food sovereignty, turning the country into an exporter of raw materials and an importer of processed products.

Mexico experienced a massive surge of U.S. investment following NAFTA’s 1994 implementation that produced half a million manufacturing jobs through 2002. But in the same period, 1.3 million workers within the agricultural sector were displaced.

More campesino protests are planned ahead of the NAFTA negotiations which are set to take place August 16 to 20 in Washington, D.C.

After the controversial phone call between Trump and the Mexican president

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After all the rumors around the phone call conversation that had president Trump and the Mexican president Enrique Peña Nieto, the Washington Post obtained the records of U.S president saying to his counterpart: “stop stating that Mexico would not pay for a wall on the border”.

“You cannot say that to the press,” Trump told Nieto, urging him to refrain from the public statements because of the political damage it would impose on Trump.

“If you are going to say that Mexico is not going to pay for the wall, then I do not want to meet with you guys anymore because I cannot live with that,” Trump told Nieto, according to the transcript.

Continue reading “After the controversial phone call between Trump and the Mexican president”

Luciano Rivera, 10th victim of crimes against journalists

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Rivera is the 10 th journalist killed during 2017 in Mexico

Luciano Rivera, is the 10 th journalist on the list of 2017 press victims in Mexico, which is considered one of the deadliest countries in the Western Hemisphere for reporters.

Rivera was murdered in Rosarito, a coastal resort city in Baja California. He was at a bar named “La Antigua de Playas de Rosarito” when a group of people assaulted and shot him directly in the face.

The attackers ran away but they were arrested soon after and the police found the murder weapon in their vehicle.

Bibi Gutierrez, president of the Association of Journalists of Tijuana, expressed her condolences in a message on her Facebook account.

Continue reading “Luciano Rivera, 10th victim of crimes against journalists”

Mexico: inmates for collective protection over torture

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Mexico’s prisons are corrupted and overcrowded

Nearly 400 inmates of Mexico’s Chiconautla state prison have won a collective protection for torture and case fabrication that will reopen their judiciary processes.

The petition for collective protection was leaded by Jose Humbertus Perez Espinoza, who founded the association Presumption of Innocence and Human Rights to ensure inmates receive due legal process.

Continue reading “Mexico: inmates for collective protection over torture”

The assassination of the Mexican journalist Javier Valdez

Another journalist was murdered in Mexico Monday, marking the sixth assassination of a reporter so far this year in one of the deadliest countries in the world for media workers.

Javier Valdez, a correspondent covering the drug-related violence and crime beat in the state of Sinaloa for Mexico’s largest daily newspaper, La Jornada, was shot dead around midday in Sinaloa’s capital of Culiacan, home base for the notorious Sinaloa cartel previously run by jailed drug lord Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman.

Valdez had released a new book just last year titled, “Narco Journalism.” The reporter was shot in the street, the Red Cross reported, where his body was left after the fatal shooting. Continue reading “The assassination of the Mexican journalist Javier Valdez”

On Mexican Mother’s Day, Hundreds of Mothers March for Their Disappeared Children

Mothers and relatives of Ayotzinapa 43 students

Mexican mothers are marching for their missing and disappeared children Wednesday, marking Mother´s Day in the country in a mass demonstration to demand justice from the state.

In the heart of Mexico City, hundreds marched from Paseo de la Reforma to the Angel de la Independencia, where organizers read out a manifesto titled, “Neither forgetfulness nor forgiveness nor reconciliation,” and instead demanded the release of political prisoners the world over and a solution to the problem of enforced disappearances by the state. Continue reading “On Mexican Mother’s Day, Hundreds of Mothers March for Their Disappeared Children”

#Call to Unity, Cooperation for Regional Sustainable Development

México,  The first meeting of the Forum of Latin American and Caribbean Countries on Sustainable Development continues here today after a call made by president Enrique Peña Nieto to achieve unity, cooperation and regional integration.

The forum is sponsored by the Economic Commission of Latin America and the Caribbean (Eclac), but is open to representatives or governments, civil organizations, organisms of the United Nations, businesspeople, international financial institutions, among other sectors and institutions.

Continue reading “#Call to Unity, Cooperation for Regional Sustainable Development”

Another Mexican Journalist Murdered in Front of His Family

Ricardo Monlui Cabrera was killed in the Mexican state of Veracruz, which is considered to be the most dangerous areas for journalists in Latin America.

Mexican journalist Ricardo Monlui Cabrera was shot dead Sunday while leaving a restaurant with his wife and son in Veracruz, a state that journalists consider one of the country’s most dangerous for reporters, a state commission reported.

“No member of his family was injured,” Jorge Morales, executive secretary of the State Commission for the Care and Protection of Journalists, told AFP. That group was created in 2012, after nine Veracruz journalists were murdered within months.

Monlui was the editor of a local business newspaper, El Politico, and wrote a column covering area politics and the sugarcane industry.

A source close to the local prosecutor’s office said Monlui and his family had been invited to breakfast at a popular restaurant in the town of Yanga.

As they were walking back to their car, another car pulled up and at least two gunmen opened fire, leaving Monlui’s body sprawled on the asphalt, the source said, speaking on grounds of anonymity.

The last Mexican media person to be killed was Cecilio Pineda, shot dead earlier this month in Guerrero state as he lay resting in a hammock.

Mexico is the most dangerous country in Latin America for journalists, particularly those working to expose corruption and criminal networks.

Continue reading “Another Mexican Journalist Murdered in Front of His Family”

Cenote Ik Kil

Blog about Mexico's Must Have Seen

WHAT ?

In the Ik Kil Cenote, you will be able to dive into the refreshing beauty of the crystal clear Ik Kil sinkhole.

The cenote is open to the sky with the water level about 26 meters below ground level. There is a carved stairway down to a swimming platform. The cenote is about 60 meters in diameter and about 40 meters deep.

There are vines which reach from the opening all the way down to the water along with small waterfalls. There are black catfish which swim in the cenote. Cenote Ik Kil is sacred to the Mayans and they used this cenote for both relaxation and ritual services.

The cenote is part of a larger complex of a restaurant, store, changing rooms, and cottages for rent. There is also a Mayan ruin on the site.

It is open to the public for swimming and is often included…

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More Than 600 Companies Want to Build Trump’s Wall

The 30-foot-high, 2,000-miles-long wall will cost at least US$21 billion and would be completed within two years.

More than 600 U.S. companies have said they were interested in building a wall across the U.S.-Mexico border, one of U.S. President Donald Trump’s major campaign promises which he had said Mexico would pay for despite the country saying it won’t.

In an executive order just weeks into his presidency, Trump instructed the department of homeland security to put together a plan to build the wall that would cover the almost 2,000-mile-long border.

In late February, the department put out a presolicitation notice for “the design and build of several prototype wall structures in the vicinity of the United States border (with) Mexico,” the Los Angeles Times reported Friday.

The department’s website shows that 600 companies have signed on for the project. The formal solicitation will go online sometime around March 15, the department said earlier this week, and concept papers will be due five days later.

The government is seeking a wall that was “nominally 30 feet tall, that will meet requirements for aesthetics, anti-climbing, and resistance to tampering or damage.”

An internal report by the department reported by Reuters last month estimated the price of a wall along the entire border at US$21.6 billion. Several surveys showed that most U.S. citizens do not want the wall. Continue reading “More Than 600 Companies Want to Build Trump’s Wall”