What should be the future of US foreign policy?

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The US foreign policy hostility is not a recent episode with president Donald Trump as the main character from now on.

As soon as Trump assumed the presidency he has spread intolerance, racism and all kind of agressive speeches against other nations. But his arrogant and disrespectful behavior is being an incentive for extremists groups and white supremacists in his own country.

Under Trump´s empire, the world is living in constant uncertainty because of his threats regarding a nuclear war, a military intervention in venezuela or the building of the border wall with Mexico.

Continue reading “What should be the future of US foreign policy?”

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Mexico earthquake victims received central American ‘Migrant Brigade’ helping hand

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After the hard impact of last week’s devastating 8.1 magnitude earthquake, low income communities are still waiting for federal assistance.

Only the Red Cross and other goodwill organizations are packing provisions and giving a basic medical assistance to those people injured and afected by the quake.

Residents in the country’s southern Oaxaca state are organizing to assist each other. Among these groups is a brigade of nearly 50 migrants from Honduras, El Salvador, Nicaragua and Guatemala, who are supporting communities in Mexico’s poverty-blighted Isthmus of Tehuantepec in Oaxaca. This brigade is working without rest in a country where they usually face discrimination, distrust and abuse.

Continue reading “Mexico earthquake victims received central American ‘Migrant Brigade’ helping hand”

Mexican campesinos protest against NAFTA

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Hundreds of agricultural workers marched in Mexico City against the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) august 7, 2017.

Hundreds of Mexican campesinos marched through the streets of the country´s capital city to demand the government leave agriculture out of the new NAFTA free trade agreement.

The protesters assured that Mexican president Peña Nieto will place the interests of transnational food corporations above the needs of the country’s small-scale farmers and further threaten the country’s agricultural sector.

The march headed from the Angel of Independence to the Ministry of the Interior, and was made up of members of the Ayala National Coordination Scheme, a campesino collective that defends land rights.

“We are not going to allow an unfavorable negotiation or that we fall on our knees before the United States. This is the beginning of a campaign for the agricultural sector to be completely excluded from NAFTA,” the organization said.

Agrarian organizations and popular movements have criticized NAFTA for affecting the country’s small producers and hurting Mexico’s overall food sovereignty, turning the country into an exporter of raw materials and an importer of processed products.

Mexico experienced a massive surge of U.S. investment following NAFTA’s 1994 implementation that produced half a million manufacturing jobs through 2002. But in the same period, 1.3 million workers within the agricultural sector were displaced.

More campesino protests are planned ahead of the NAFTA negotiations which are set to take place August 16 to 20 in Washington, D.C.

After the controversial phone call between Trump and the Mexican president

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After all the rumors around the phone call conversation that had president Trump and the Mexican president Enrique Peña Nieto, the Washington Post obtained the records of U.S president saying to his counterpart: “stop stating that Mexico would not pay for a wall on the border”.

“You cannot say that to the press,” Trump told Nieto, urging him to refrain from the public statements because of the political damage it would impose on Trump.

“If you are going to say that Mexico is not going to pay for the wall, then I do not want to meet with you guys anymore because I cannot live with that,” Trump told Nieto, according to the transcript.

Continue reading “After the controversial phone call between Trump and the Mexican president”

Luciano Rivera, 10th victim of crimes against journalists

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Rivera is the 10 th journalist killed during 2017 in Mexico

Luciano Rivera, is the 10 th journalist on the list of 2017 press victims in Mexico, which is considered one of the deadliest countries in the Western Hemisphere for reporters.

Rivera was murdered in Rosarito, a coastal resort city in Baja California. He was at a bar named “La Antigua de Playas de Rosarito” when a group of people assaulted and shot him directly in the face.

The attackers ran away but they were arrested soon after and the police found the murder weapon in their vehicle.

Bibi Gutierrez, president of the Association of Journalists of Tijuana, expressed her condolences in a message on her Facebook account.

Continue reading “Luciano Rivera, 10th victim of crimes against journalists”

Mexico: inmates for collective protection over torture

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Mexico’s prisons are corrupted and overcrowded

Nearly 400 inmates of Mexico’s Chiconautla state prison have won a collective protection for torture and case fabrication that will reopen their judiciary processes.

The petition for collective protection was leaded by Jose Humbertus Perez Espinoza, who founded the association Presumption of Innocence and Human Rights to ensure inmates receive due legal process.

Continue reading “Mexico: inmates for collective protection over torture”

The assassination of the Mexican journalist Javier Valdez

Another journalist was murdered in Mexico Monday, marking the sixth assassination of a reporter so far this year in one of the deadliest countries in the world for media workers.

Javier Valdez, a correspondent covering the drug-related violence and crime beat in the state of Sinaloa for Mexico’s largest daily newspaper, La Jornada, was shot dead around midday in Sinaloa’s capital of Culiacan, home base for the notorious Sinaloa cartel previously run by jailed drug lord Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman.

Valdez had released a new book just last year titled, “Narco Journalism.” The reporter was shot in the street, the Red Cross reported, where his body was left after the fatal shooting. Continue reading “The assassination of the Mexican journalist Javier Valdez”

On Mexican Mother’s Day, Hundreds of Mothers March for Their Disappeared Children

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Mexican mothers are marching for their missing and disappeared children Wednesday, marking Mother´s Day in the country in a mass demonstration to demand justice from the state.

In the heart of Mexico City, hundreds marched from Paseo de la Reforma to the Angel de la Independencia, where organizers read out a manifesto titled, “Neither forgetfulness nor forgiveness nor reconciliation,” and instead demanded the release of political prisoners the world over and a solution to the problem of enforced disappearances by the state. Continue reading “On Mexican Mother’s Day, Hundreds of Mothers March for Their Disappeared Children”