The assassination of the Mexican journalist Javier Valdez

Another journalist was murdered in Mexico Monday, marking the sixth assassination of a reporter so far this year in one of the deadliest countries in the world for media workers.

Javier Valdez, a correspondent covering the drug-related violence and crime beat in the state of Sinaloa for Mexico’s largest daily newspaper, La Jornada, was shot dead around midday in Sinaloa’s capital of Culiacan, home base for the notorious Sinaloa cartel previously run by jailed drug lord Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman.

Valdez had released a new book just last year titled, “Narco Journalism.” The reporter was shot in the street, the Red Cross reported, where his body was left after the fatal shooting. Continue reading “The assassination of the Mexican journalist Javier Valdez”

On Mexican Mother’s Day, Hundreds of Mothers March for Their Disappeared Children

Mothers and relatives of Ayotzinapa 43 students

Mexican mothers are marching for their missing and disappeared children Wednesday, marking Mother´s Day in the country in a mass demonstration to demand justice from the state.

In the heart of Mexico City, hundreds marched from Paseo de la Reforma to the Angel de la Independencia, where organizers read out a manifesto titled, “Neither forgetfulness nor forgiveness nor reconciliation,” and instead demanded the release of political prisoners the world over and a solution to the problem of enforced disappearances by the state. Continue reading “On Mexican Mother’s Day, Hundreds of Mothers March for Their Disappeared Children”

#Call to Unity, Cooperation for Regional Sustainable Development

México,  The first meeting of the Forum of Latin American and Caribbean Countries on Sustainable Development continues here today after a call made by president Enrique Peña Nieto to achieve unity, cooperation and regional integration.

The forum is sponsored by the Economic Commission of Latin America and the Caribbean (Eclac), but is open to representatives or governments, civil organizations, organisms of the United Nations, businesspeople, international financial institutions, among other sectors and institutions.

Continue reading “#Call to Unity, Cooperation for Regional Sustainable Development”

Another Mexican Journalist Murdered in Front of His Family

Ricardo Monlui Cabrera was killed in the Mexican state of Veracruz, which is considered to be the most dangerous areas for journalists in Latin America.

Mexican journalist Ricardo Monlui Cabrera was shot dead Sunday while leaving a restaurant with his wife and son in Veracruz, a state that journalists consider one of the country’s most dangerous for reporters, a state commission reported.

“No member of his family was injured,” Jorge Morales, executive secretary of the State Commission for the Care and Protection of Journalists, told AFP. That group was created in 2012, after nine Veracruz journalists were murdered within months.

Monlui was the editor of a local business newspaper, El Politico, and wrote a column covering area politics and the sugarcane industry.

A source close to the local prosecutor’s office said Monlui and his family had been invited to breakfast at a popular restaurant in the town of Yanga.

As they were walking back to their car, another car pulled up and at least two gunmen opened fire, leaving Monlui’s body sprawled on the asphalt, the source said, speaking on grounds of anonymity.

The last Mexican media person to be killed was Cecilio Pineda, shot dead earlier this month in Guerrero state as he lay resting in a hammock.

Mexico is the most dangerous country in Latin America for journalists, particularly those working to expose corruption and criminal networks.

Continue reading “Another Mexican Journalist Murdered in Front of His Family”

Cenote Ik Kil

Blog about Mexico's Must Have Seen

WHAT ?

In the Ik Kil Cenote, you will be able to dive into the refreshing beauty of the crystal clear Ik Kil sinkhole.

The cenote is open to the sky with the water level about 26 meters below ground level. There is a carved stairway down to a swimming platform. The cenote is about 60 meters in diameter and about 40 meters deep.

There are vines which reach from the opening all the way down to the water along with small waterfalls. There are black catfish which swim in the cenote. Cenote Ik Kil is sacred to the Mayans and they used this cenote for both relaxation and ritual services.

The cenote is part of a larger complex of a restaurant, store, changing rooms, and cottages for rent. There is also a Mayan ruin on the site.

It is open to the public for swimming and is often included…

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More Than 600 Companies Want to Build Trump’s Wall

The 30-foot-high, 2,000-miles-long wall will cost at least US$21 billion and would be completed within two years.

More than 600 U.S. companies have said they were interested in building a wall across the U.S.-Mexico border, one of U.S. President Donald Trump’s major campaign promises which he had said Mexico would pay for despite the country saying it won’t.

In an executive order just weeks into his presidency, Trump instructed the department of homeland security to put together a plan to build the wall that would cover the almost 2,000-mile-long border.

In late February, the department put out a presolicitation notice for “the design and build of several prototype wall structures in the vicinity of the United States border (with) Mexico,” the Los Angeles Times reported Friday.

The department’s website shows that 600 companies have signed on for the project. The formal solicitation will go online sometime around March 15, the department said earlier this week, and concept papers will be due five days later.

The government is seeking a wall that was “nominally 30 feet tall, that will meet requirements for aesthetics, anti-climbing, and resistance to tampering or damage.”

An internal report by the department reported by Reuters last month estimated the price of a wall along the entire border at US$21.6 billion. Several surveys showed that most U.S. citizens do not want the wall. Continue reading “More Than 600 Companies Want to Build Trump’s Wall”

Mexican Actor Gael Garcia Bernal Slams Trump’s Border Wall at Oscars

 

The Mexican star has blasted Trump in the past, and the Oscars were no exception.

Mexican actor Gael Garcia Bernal used his time on the Oscar’s stage Sunday to criticize President Donald Trump and his border wall plan as one of many celebrities to raise political themes during the Academy Awards ceremony.

Presenting the Oscar for best animated film, Garcia Bernal slammed Trump’s promise to build a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border.

“Flesh and blood actors are migrant workers. We travel all over the world, we build families, we construct stories, we build life that cannot be divided,” he said.

“As a Mexican, as a Latin American, as a migrant worker, as a human being, I’m against any form of wall that wants to separate us.”

Garcia Bernal, known for his performance in films including “The Motorcycle Diaries” and “Amores Perros” as well as the web television series “Mozart in the Jungle,” has spoken out about Trump in the past.

After Trump’s Nov. 8 election, Garcia Bernal tweeted in Spanish, “Build your fucking wall. History will take care of the failed plan to make Mexico pay. And to open the holes that there will always be.”

Weeks earlier, he told “The Late Show with Stephen Colbert” that although Trump’s run for president was initially seen as a “joke” by Mexicans, his popularity eventually sparked “nervousness, fear and anger” — sentiments that have only increased since the reality TV star-turn-president took over the White House.

Continue reading “Mexican Actor Gael Garcia Bernal Slams Trump’s Border Wall at Oscars”

Cuba defends itself before the OAS, Felipe Calderon and Mariana Aylwin

“Cuba will never return to the OAS,” Cuba’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs wrote in a statement. 

Cuba denied entry to the Organization of American States (OAS), head of the OAS, Luis Almagro, who was to receive a prize from a mercenary group in Havana.

The socialist government also denied entry to former Mexican President Felipe Calderón and Mariana Aylwin, daughter of former Chilean President Patricio Aylwin.

Mainstream media quickly painted Cuba’s decision to block their entry as another example of the country’s so-called “totalitarianism.” But shortly after they released these reports, Cuba’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs commissioned a statement clearing up these accusations.

“The plan, plotted on several trips between Washington and other capitals of the region, was to mount in Havana an open and serious provocation against the Cuban government, generate internal instability, and damage the international image of the country,” the statement reads.

“Upon learning of these plans and enforcing the laws that underpin the nation’s sovereignty, the Cuban government decided to deny foreign nationals associated with the events described above to the national territory.”

According to the statement, Cuba refused entry to Almagro for three main reasons:

Continue reading “Cuba defends itself before the OAS, Felipe Calderon and Mariana Aylwin”

Thousands Attend Hate Rallies in Mexico Against LGBTQ People

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Thousands of Mexicans took to the streets of cities across the country Saturday to “defend their children” and “defend the traditional family” against the the alleged threat of gay marriage.

The so-called “march for the family” was called by the National Front for the Family, a Catholic organization that was created last May after Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto submitted a proposal to Congress to legalize gay marriage nationwide.

The initiative was seen as a move by Peña Nieto to gain popular support amid historically low approval ratings, and was ultimately dropped by lawmakers of his own party.

However, the most conservative wing of Mexico, including the archbishop of Norberto Rivera and other religious congregations, have supported and joined a campaign against the lingering threat of equality—a campaign that has been widely criticized by intellectuals, politician and civil organizations for promoting hatred and violence against the LGBT community.

Members of the National Front for the Family say they represent more than one million families in Mexico and argue that they obtain resources from their own members. However, critics say the participation of the Catholic Church is evident in this political movement, with LGBT activists calling it a violation of Mexico’s secular democracy.

Continue reading “Thousands Attend Hate Rallies in Mexico Against LGBTQ People”

Mexican Police Accused of Executing 22, Then Covering It Up

The murders from last year again illustrate how pervasive police corruption is in Mexico.

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Mexico’s human rights body said on Thursday that the country’s police force carried out 22 extrajudicial executions on a ranch in Tanhuato in the western state of Michoacan in May 2015.

The Mexican Government’s National Human Rights Commission, CNDH, said that the 22 executions took place during a raid on the ranch by federal police who ambushed and killed 42 suspected members of the Jalisco New Generation Cartel, JNG.

“The investigation confirmed facts that show grave human rights violations attributable to public servants of the federal police,” commission President Luis Raul Gonzalez Perez said.

The human rights body says that the police moved seven dead bodies, planted guns and lied about their actions in the raid. Police are also alleged to have burned two bodies and tortured two people once they were arrested. One policeman was killed in the battle.

The raid was backed by a Black Hawk helicopter which reportedly shot around 4,000 rounds that reportedly killed five people. The deaths of 15 other victims was unable to be established, said CNDH President Raul Gonzalez.

The CNDH has called the raid one of the country’s worst cases of violence by security forces in a long and violent drug war.

Human rights advocates have constantly called on authorities to uphold higher standards amidst the drug war’s ongoing violence. In a press conference, Mexico’s National Security Commissioner Renato Sales said that he did not accept that police carried out the alleged executions, but rather “acted in legitimate defense” against “imminent and unlawful aggression.”

Continue reading “Mexican Police Accused of Executing 22, Then Covering It Up”