Mexican campesinos protest against NAFTA

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Hundreds of agricultural workers marched in Mexico City against the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) august 7, 2017.

Hundreds of Mexican campesinos marched through the streets of the country´s capital city to demand the government leave agriculture out of the new NAFTA free trade agreement.

The protesters assured that Mexican president Peña Nieto will place the interests of transnational food corporations above the needs of the country’s small-scale farmers and further threaten the country’s agricultural sector.

The march headed from the Angel of Independence to the Ministry of the Interior, and was made up of members of the Ayala National Coordination Scheme, a campesino collective that defends land rights.

“We are not going to allow an unfavorable negotiation or that we fall on our knees before the United States. This is the beginning of a campaign for the agricultural sector to be completely excluded from NAFTA,” the organization said.

Agrarian organizations and popular movements have criticized NAFTA for affecting the country’s small producers and hurting Mexico’s overall food sovereignty, turning the country into an exporter of raw materials and an importer of processed products.

Mexico experienced a massive surge of U.S. investment following NAFTA’s 1994 implementation that produced half a million manufacturing jobs through 2002. But in the same period, 1.3 million workers within the agricultural sector were displaced.

More campesino protests are planned ahead of the NAFTA negotiations which are set to take place August 16 to 20 in Washington, D.C.

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Sao Paulo Forum concludes with a claim for Latin American countries unity

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For the first time in the history of Latin America and the Caribbean countries have developing processes of revolutionary transformation or progressive social reform. But these achievements are threatened by a regional right-wing offensive to reverse social transformations in Venezuela, Bolivia, Ecuador, Uruguay, Nicaragua and El Salvador.

The biggest error of Latin American people is to forget a past of horror, of coups d`états, of plans for training mercenaries, of tortures, military dictatorships and thousands of disappeared progressive leaders. All those episodes were the result of conservative and imperialist groups action.

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Brazilian Anarchists, Communists March Against Temer

One year after the parliamentary coup that ousted former Brazilian president Dilma Rousseff and installed right-wing Michel Temer as president, the third edition of the annual Antifascist March on Saturday saw hundreds protesting in a number of cities across Brazil.

Organized by legions of anarchists, communists and a number of other left-wing organizations, the march was held in 20 cities and 15 states. It was organized in order to protest against the country’s “conservative advance” and the policies of the extreme right.

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